How to Eat Right for Youth Soccer
With good nutrition, young players can discover a whole new level of performance. A good soccer diet can also help prevent injury, reduce recovery time between games and create a lifetime of good eating habits.
 
Soccer Diet - Pre Game Meals

Athletes constantly look after improving his or her body, increasing its maximum potential and forcing it over the natural "limit" that the average human body possesses. This is done through hard training and professional athletes spend most of their careers improving themselves, training out at some extent almost every day of the year. With that much effort comes an equally high energy consumption and that's where a diet will come in.

Although the general dietary rules above will work well around the week, you'll be much better off following specific diets prior and after playing a match.

Eating a normal course just before a match will have several disadvantages. You don't want to feel "full" before a match or before practice, since it will hinder your ability to run, your agility, jumping and so forth. Not eating at all before a match or practice is not a good idea either. Going into a match without eating will have you playing in a weakened state and won't allow you to perform at your maximum potential.

So what you need to do is find something to eat that is light but can still provide you with a good source of energy to cope with the upcoming effort. These pre-match snacks can contain fruits or vegetables or some light bread product. Not all fruits and vegetables are ideal though. You'll also want to pick up those that are rich in carbohydrates, in order to charge yourself up with energy before the match.

Some of the most carb-rich fruits out there include apples, peaches, oranges, and grapefruits. Breads are usually harder on the stomach, but they also offer you a rich carbohydrate base. So a slice of toast or some crackers could be beneficial.

You'll also want to pay attention in your soccer diet to the GI value of the food you eat in your pre game meal. The GI is short for Glycemic Index and it's a scale of how much a certain type of food raises the level of blood sugar in comparison to pure glucose. Before matches, it's recommended that the food you eat contains as low GI value as possible because low GI foods help conserve energy during effort. You'll find a list of foods with GI of 55 or less at the bottom of the this soccer diet article.

Fueling your body - Provided by Seattle United and UW Medicine

http://seattleunited.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/nutrition.pdf

 
2016 Eat to Compete Soccer: YOUTH

2016 Eat to Compete Soccer YOUTH.pdf

Pre-Event Nutrition: FUEL

The pre-event meal serves two purposes:

  • to prevent athletes from feeling hungry.
  • to help supply fuel to the muscles during trainingand competition.

Pre-Exercise Snacks and Meals:

  • Always eat familiar foods before competition
  • Meals/Snacks: high in complex carbohydrates, moderate inlean protein, low in fat and fiber

2016 Eat to Compete Soccer YOUTH.pdf

Examples of complex carbohydrates: whole grains such as: pastas, breads, bagels, tortillas, cereals, oatmeal, crackers and brown rice. Whole fruit such as apple, pear, banana, orange. Starchy vegetables such as potatoes, peas, corn.

Examples of lean protein: chicken or turkey without skin, lean cuts of red meat and/or pork (cut of meat is round or loin), fish, low-fat dairy, eggs, tofu, edamame, whey or soy protein powder.

  • 3-4 hours before exercise:
  • Oatmeal with brown sugar and almonds, skim milk, banana
  • Peanut butter on toast, instant breakfast drink
  • Turkey and cheddar sandwich, fruit, sports drink
  • Low fat tuna melt sandwich, fruit cup, fat free yogurt
  • 1-2 hours before exercise:

Fresh fruit, breads, bagels, cereals, high carbohydrate energybar, yogurt, low fat chocolate milk
Avoid:

  • High fat foods (high-fat meats, heavy sauces/creams,fried or buttery foods, desserts)
  • High fiber foods (cruciferous vegetables, whole grainsvery high in fiber, beans)
  • Carbonated beverages
  • Sugary beverages and foods

Post Event Nutrition: RECOVER

  • Post exercise snacks/meals are important for rehydration,replenishing glycogen (energy) stores and repairing leanmuscle mass.
  • Eat carbohydrates as soon as possible, preferably within 30minutes of exercising. This will help rebuild energy stores.
  • Within 2 hours, quicken recovery by eating a highcarbohydrate meal that contains a lean protein source.

Recovery Foods for Snacks and Meals:

  • Within 30 minutes after practice or competition: eat a 2:1ratio of carbs-to-protein.
    Note: For adolescents, daily protein needs:
    • Approx. 0.33-0.5 g protein per 1lb body wt.
    • Aka approx. 10%-30% total caloric intake
  • Snack options: (serving size depends on individual needs)
    • Low fat chocolate milk with sports bar
    • High protein energy bar and 8-16 ounce sports drink
    • Greek or Plain Yogurt with berries
    • Whole wheat bread with lean meat, cheese & veggies
    • Graham Crackers with peanut butter and low fat milk
  • Recovery meal should include: (within 2 hours) Complexcarbohydrates covering at least two-thirds of the plate.Moderate protein to aid in repair of damaged muscle tissue.Remember to include fruits and vegetables.
  • Whole wheat sub sandwich with ham or turkey and veggiesplus baked chips, fruit, and low fat milk
    Or Stir fry with lean steak, broccoli, bell peppers, and carrotswith brown rice
    Or 5-6 ounces lean beef, turkey, or chicken, beans or corn,green salad, and fruit

Provided by: Julie Mahler, MS, RDN, CD email: julie.mahler@irgpt.com, Hilary Hendrix, MS, RD, CD email: hilary.hendrix@irgpt.com

 

2016 Eat to Compete Soccer YOUTH.pdf

Pre-Event Nutrition: FUEL

The pre-event meal serves two purposes:

  • to prevent athletes from feeling hungry.
  • to help supply fuel to the muscles during trainingand competition.

Pre-Exercise Snacks and Meals:

  • Always eat familiar foods before competition
  • Meals/Snacks: high in complex carbohydrates, moderate inlean protein, low in fat and fiber

Examples of complex carbohydrates: whole grains such as: pastas, breads, bagels, tortillas, cereals, oatmeal, crackers and brown rice. Whole fruit such as apple, pear, banana, orange. Starchy vegetables such as potatoes, peas, corn.

Examples of lean protein: chicken or turkey without skin, lean cuts of red meat and/or pork (cut of meat is round or loin), fish, low-fat dairy, eggs, tofu, edamame, whey or soy protein powder.

  • 3-4 hours before exercise:
  • Oatmeal with brown sugar and almonds, skim milk, banana
  • Peanut butter on toast, instant breakfast drink
  • Turkey and cheddar sandwich, fruit, sports drink
  • Low fat tuna melt sandwich, fruit cup, fat free yogurt
  • 1-2 hours before exercise:

Fresh fruit, breads, bagels, cereals, high carbohydrate energybar, yogurt, low fat chocolate milk
Avoid:

  • High fat foods (high-fat meats, heavy sauces/creams,fried or buttery foods, desserts)
  • High fiber foods (cruciferous vegetables, whole grainsvery high in fiber, beans)
  • Carbonated beverages
  • Sugary beverages and foods

Post Event Nutrition: RECOVER

  • Post exercise snacks/meals are important for rehydration,replenishing glycogen (energy) stores and repairing leanmuscle mass.
  • Eat carbohydrates as soon as possible, preferably within 30minutes of exercising. This will help rebuild energy stores.
  • Within 2 hours, quicken recovery by eating a highcarbohydrate meal that contains a lean protein source.

Recovery Foods for Snacks and Meals:

  • Within 30 minutes after practice or competition: eat a 2:1ratio of carbs-to-protein.
    Note: For adolescents, daily protein needs:
    • Approx. 0.33-0.5 g protein per 1lb body wt.
    • Aka approx. 10%-30% total caloric intake
  • Snack options: (serving size depends on individual needs)
    • Low fat chocolate milk with sports bar
    • High protein energy bar and 8-16 ounce sports drink
    • Greek or Plain Yogurt with berries
    • Whole wheat bread with lean meat, cheese & veggies
    • Graham Crackers with peanut butter and low fat milk
  • Recovery meal should include: (within 2 hours) Complexcarbohydrates covering at least two-thirds of the plate.Moderate protein to aid in repair of damaged muscle tissue.Remember to include fruits and vegetables.
  • Whole wheat sub sandwich with ham or turkey and veggiesplus baked chips, fruit, and low fat milk
    Or Stir fry with lean steak, broccoli, bell peppers, and carrotswith brown rice
    Or 5-6 ounces lean beef, turkey, or chicken, beans or corn,green salad, and fruit

Provided by: Julie Mahler, MS, RDN, CD email: julie.mahler@irgpt.com, Hilary Hendrix, MS, RD, CD email: hilary.hendrix@irgpt.com

 
Consult Your Physician or Dietician
The information on this website is intended as an educational and informational source only. It doesn't replace the advice of a qualified nutritionist, so it's advisable that you visit a specialist before taking up any of the nutritional suggestions on the website. Make sure you consult your family physician or dietician before starting any type of diet, lifestyle or nutritional change. Some diets may be harmful for persons suffering from certain medical conditions.
 
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